AVAILABLE FOR FREE STREAMING SEPTEMBER 15 - 22, 2021​

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Carly Brascoupé introduces her curated program "àdisòkàn gaye minawázawin".
National Indigenous Media Arts Coalition

National Indigenous Media Arts Coalition Presents:

àdisòkàn gaye minawázawin

Curated by: Carly Brascoupé

Still image from: "Twilight Dancers", Paola Marino and Theola Ross, 2017
 

 

àdisòkàn gaye minawázawin


Kwey Carly Brascoupé nindijinkaz. Kitigan Zibi Anishinaabeg gaye Batchewana Bay gaye Tkaronto, Ontario. Nindonjiba makwa ni dodem 

Hello!

My name is Carly Brascoupé. I am Algonquin from Kitigan Zibi Anishinaabeg in Quebec and Ojibway from Batchewana Bay First Nation in Ontario. I was born and raised in Tkaronto, Ontario. I am from the bear clan.

I am enthusiastic to present these carefully selected films with VUCAVU and the National Indigenous Media Arts Coalition in my capacity as the Program and Outreach Coordinator. It is a privilege to showcase these filmmakers from the Afro-Indigenous, 2-Spirited, women, and dance community to reconnect and share their stories with Indigenous people, and youth. 

"I ran towards our smudge bowl, sweet grass and sage, and started smudging. And had hopes that my prayers will be answered to bring my mother back from the spirit world."

- Quote from "Healing Bells" (2018) 

The healing process is gradual which begins with establishing safety, remembering, grieving, and restoring relationships.

Indigenous peoples continue to experience intergenerational trauma due to the legacy of residential school experiences as evidenced by the social and economic disparities among First Nations, Inuit and Métis today. The healing process is gradual which begins with establishing safety, remembering, grieving, and restoring relationships. Through these stages, Indigenous survivors and children of residential school survivors are often confronted with personal traumas including shock, fear, and sometimes guilt.

Storytelling has always been our way to transmit oral history which now include media, film, video, dance, and music. It is also a way to express ourselves through healing and providing hope, inspiration, and determination for the next generation. 

I present to you àdisòkàn gaye minawázawin which means ‘Stories of Happiness’ in the Algonquin dialect. 

-  Carly Brascoupé



Please make sure to enter NIMAC’s giveaway to win 1 of 2 prizes from Indigenous businesses on Instagram @indigenous_media_art.

Let us know which film you enjoyed the most!

 

Storytelling has always been our way to transmit oral history which now include media, film, video, dance, and music. It is also a way to express ourselves through healing and providing hope, inspiration, and determination for the next generation. 

ABOUT THE CURATOR: CARLY BRASCOUPÉ


Carly Brascoupé is in the position of Outreach and Programming Coordinator for NIMAC (National Indigenous Arts Coalition) and IMAA (Independent Media Arts Alliance). Carly will work with NIMAC until November and will continue the position with the IMAA.

Carly Brascoupé is an Anishinaabe kwe from Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg, Quebec, and Batchewana Bay First Nation, Ontario. She was born and raised in the Dish with One Spoon Treaty Territory also known as Tkaronto, Ontario.

A graduate of Humber College's Advanced Public Relations program, she is a creative writer with an interest in contemporary Indigenous fashion, textiles, and the arts. She is also passionate about photography, film, and music. Previously, she worked as an event photographer and promoted fashion and lifestyle brands.

 

ABOUT THE PROGRAMMING PARTNERS


The National Indigenous Media Arts Coalition’s (NIMAC) priority is to support, promote, and advocate for Indigenous media artists and arts organizations within the context of Canadian media arts practices. We connect Indigenous artists to not-for-profit arts organizations on a national scale.

Wapikoni Mobile is an indigenous organization that fosters artistic creation and excellence to serve the narrative sovereignty of Nations. Its mobile intervention, training and audiovisual creation studios travel across the country to meet indigenous communities. Its mission is to amplify the voices of youth through short films and music, to disseminate these works across Canada and around the world, and to provide a tool for professional development and social transformation. Wapikoni is a non-profit and charitable organization supported by many public and private partners. Since 2017, Wapikoni is also an official UNESCO partner.

The Independent Media Arts Alliance (IMAA) is a member-driven non-profit national organization working to advance and strengthen the media arts community in Canada.  Representing over 100 independent film, video, audio, and new media production, distribution, and exhibition organizations in all parts of the country, the IMAA serves over 16,000 independent media artists and cultural workers.



NIMAC would like to thank their funders, the Canada Council for the Arts, and the Canadian Government's Young Canada Works program.

       

 

This curated program is part of the VUCAVU Expanded project.
We acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts.​